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What is Lifestyle Disease

Lifestyle disease is a group of conditions that are associated with how people live. This includes eating habits, smoking (tobacco), drug and alcohol use, and exercise. 


We used to think that lifestyle disease only included conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). 


We now know that unhealthy lifestyles are the cause of many conditions and diseases. It is estimated that the majority of issues primary care providers (NPs and MDs) see in day-to-day practice are associated with unhealthy lifestyle. 62% of all primary care visits in Canada are for the management of chronic disease (e.g. Diabetes type 2). 1


Obesity in particular is a confirmed risk factor for cardiovascular disease, metabolic diseases, cancers, and mental health conditions. 2 3 4 Sixty percent of Canadian adults are now overweight or obese. 5 6  It is estimated that by 2021 the yearly direct health care costs associated with obesity in Canada will reach $8.8 billion. 7

Learn More

We arrange screening tests because we know that if we can catch some diseases in the early stages we can often stop the disease from advancing. Find out more here. 

disease screening

Endnotes

  1. Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2014). Chronic disease management in primary health care: a demonstration of EMR data for quality and health system monitoring. Retrieved from https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products/Burden-of-Chronic-Diseases_PHC_2014_AiB_EN-web.pdf 
  2. Canadian Medical Association. (2012). CMA brief to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health: Health promotion and disease prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/Haggie-HC-Health-Promotion-Disease-Prevention-Feb2012_en.pdf.
  3. Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). (2017). Healthy living can prevent disease. Ottawa, ON: Public Health Agency of Canada. Retrieved from http://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/chronic-diseases/healthy-living-prevent-disease.html
  4. Sarris, J., Logan, A., Akbaraly, T., Amminger, G.P., Balanza-Martinez, V., Freeman, M., …Jacka, F. (2015). Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry. The Lancet, 2(3), 271-274. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2215036614000510
  5. Canadian Obesity Network. (2017b). Report card on access to obesity treatment for adults in Canada 2017.  Edmonton, AB: Canadian Obesity Network Inc. Retrieved from http://www.obesitynetwork.ca/files/FULLREPORTfinalENG.pdf
  6. Statistics Canada. (2016). Body mass index, overweight or obese, self-reported, adult, by age group and sex (percent). Ottawa, ON: Government of Canada. Retrieved from https://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/health81b-eng.htm
  7. Canadian Obesity Network. (2017b). Report card on access to obesity treatment for adults in Canada 2017.  Edmonton, AB: Canadian Obesity Network Inc. Retrieved from http://www.obesitynetwork.ca/files/FULLREPORTfinalENG.pdf

Disclaimer

The information provided on npsam.ca is not intended to replace consultation with a qualified health care professional. You are encouraged to inform your nurse practitioner or physician of any changes you make to your lifestyle. If you have questions or concerns about any medical conditions please book an appointment with your nurse practitioner or physician.